Agora 2010

Programme

The Agora aims to contribute to the preparation of the new metropolitan land-use and development plan for the Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal (CMM), as stipulated in Bill 58. The Agora provides citizens, academics, and civil-society organizations in the Montréal region with a forum in which to collectively reflect on the plan’s contents and implementation and to develop proposals related to three themes: Green Prosperity, Land-Use and Mobility, and Quality of Life in our Living Environments.

Friday, december 3, 2010

2:00 p.m. Registration
2:30 p.m. Introduction
Florence Junca-Adenot, Agora moderator and Director of Forum Urba 2015, UQAM.
2:40 – 2:50 p.m. Welcoming Address
Phyllis Lambert, President, Institut de politiques alternatives de Montréal (IPAM).
Dinu Bumbaru, Policy Director, Heritage Montreal.
2:50 – 3:20 p.m. Opening Speech
Laurent Lessard, Ministre des Affaires municipales, des Régions et de l’Organisation des territoires (MAMROT), or his representative.
Gérald Tremblay, President of the Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal (CMM).
3:20 – 4:50 p.m. Conferences: Other Regions’ Experiences.
“Planning in the Boston region: The process and citizens’ involvement.”
Timothy G. Reardon, Planner, Boston Metropolitan Planning Council (in English).
“La planification stratégique intégrée pour le Grand Lyon depuis 20 ans: écueils et succès de la collaboration entre acteurs publics à l’échelle métropolitaine.”
Franck Scherrer, former member of the Conseil de développement du Grand Lyon and Director of the Institut d’urbanisme, Université de Montréal.
“Integrated land-use and transportation planning in Vancouver.”
Ken Cameron, official in charge of planning for Greater Vancouver (in English).
4:50 – 5:40 p.m. Discussion Period
5:40 p.m. Cocktails and discussion among participants

Saturday, December 4, 2010

8:00 – 8:05 a.m.
Recap of the issues and proceedings.
Florence Junca-Adenot, Agora moderator and Director of Forum Urba 2015, UQAM.
8:05 – 8:35 a.m. Vision
“Making a Great Place, Elements for Successful Metropolitan Planning.”
Michael Burton, Vice Provost, Portland State University, former mayor of Portland (in English).
8:35 – 9:15 a.m. Quality of Life in Our Environments
Moderator : Pierre Bélanger, Directeur général, Association québécoise du transport intermunicipal et municipal.
Speakers : Daniel Gill, Professor, Institut d’urbanisme, Université de Montréal.
Guy Garand, Directeur général, Conseil régional de l’environnement de Laval.
Response : Louis Drouin, physician, Public Health Department, Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal.
Reporter : Jean Paré, urban planner, former member of the Office de consultation publique de Montréal
9:15 – 10:40 a.m.: Discussion
10:40 – 10:50 a.m.: Pause
10:50 – 11:30 a.m. Green Prosperity
Moderator : Sydney Ribaux, Executive Coordinator, Équiterre.
Speakers : Marcel Côté, Founding Associate, Groupe SECOR.
(Speakers to be confirmed)
Response : Hélène Bergeron, Managing Director, South Shore Chamber of Commerce and Industry.
Reporter : Henry Aubin, journalist, The Gazette
11:30 a.m. – 12:55 p.m.: Discussion
12:55 – 2:00 p.m.: Buffet
2:00 – 2:40 p.m. Land-Use and Mobility
Moderator : Suzanne Lareau, President and General Manager, Vélo Québec.
Speakers : Pierre Giard, Général Manager, Société de transport de Laval.
Alexandre Turgeon, Président exécutif, Vivre en ville.
Response : Paul Lewis, Professor, Institut d’urbanisme, Université de Montréal.
Reporter : Yves Archambault, urban planner, Professor, Urban Studies, UQAM.
2:40 – 4:00 p.m. Discussion.
4:00 – 4:45 p.m. Plenary Assembly Reports.
4:45 – 4:55 p.m. General Observations.
Gérard Beaudet, Director of the Observatoire sur la mobilité, Institut d’urbanisme, Université de Montréal.
4:55 – 5:00 p.m. Concluding Remarks, Follow-Up, Expression of Thanks.
Florence Junca-Adenot, Agora moderator and Director of Forum Urba 2015, UQAM.

Issues to talk about in each theme

Block 1 – “Green” Prosperity

Issues Questions
  1. Can sustainable and economic development work together in the region and how? Which “green” economy sectors should be identified and prioritized for the metropolitan region?
  2. What value can we put on a vibrant metropolitan centre? What economically complementary activities can we envisage in different parts of the region in order to maintain well-structured, equitably distributed dynamic metropolitan activity clusters?
  3. How does one reconcile new commercial and industrial development with the continued vitality of our existing downtown cores, village and borough centres?
  4. How can we encourage the use of new green technologies in buildings and thus promote energy savings and reduced greenhouse gas emissions?
  5. How can the new green economy help the metropolitan region become more competitive at the global level?
  1. What are the most urgent problems?
  2. What objectives should be emphasized?
  3. What activities should preference be given to?
  4. What objectives have the highest priority and what key guidelines can be identified?
  5. How can civil society contribute?

Block 2 – Land-Use and Population Mobility

Issues Questions
  1. How can we improve the coordination of urban land-use and transportation planning? How can activity clusters (businesses and jobs) be planned in relation to the public transport networks and vice versa?
  2. How can the problem of urban automobile congestion be resolved across the metropolitan region? What alternative means of transportation can we favour?
  3. How do we enable students and workers to get to their places of study or work easily by means of active or public transportation?
  4. How can we organize urban areas across the metropolitan region to allow more room for public transport and bicycle and pedestrian traffic?
  5. What incentive or restrictive measures can we adopt that will limit automobile use with a view to reducing the amount of greenhouse gases?
  1. What are the most urgent problems?
  2. What objectives should be emphasized?
  3. What activities should preference be given to?
  4. What objectives have the highest priority and what key guidelines can be identified?
  5. How can civil society contribute?

Block 3 – Quality of Living Environments and Principles of Sustainable Development

Issues Questions
  1. On what values is the quality of living environments in the metropolitan region based, and how can we incorporate them in land- use and development plans?
  2. How can demographic trends and the increasing diversity of lifestyles find expression in the planning of our cities and in the metropolitan region? How do we adapt existing models to new needs in a way that is affordable for everyone?
  3. To ensure effectiveness of services and facilities, must we increase residential or workplace density in new or already built up neighbourhoods? What density levels do we wish to have? How do we attain them? What are the benefits and disadvantages?
  4. How can we protect and improve landscapes, natural areas and built up sectors in the metropolitan region? What priorities must be set in this regard, and how can we develop an overall vision?
  5. How can we reconcile urban development with the preservation of agricultural lands? How can we integrate development in the city and outlying agricultural areas in our urban land-use schemes?
  6. How can we design our living environments so as to better manage environmental and public health risks, especially along transportation corridors?
  1. What are the most urgent problems?
  2. What objectives should be emphasized?
  3. What activities should preference be given to?
  4. What objectives have the highest priority and what key guidelines can be identified?
  5. How can civil society contribute?