IPAM presents Saskia Sassen

The City, today and tomorrow and redefining Citizenship

Sunday, May 30, 4:30-6:30
School of Community and Public Affairs
Concordia University, 2149 MacKay (just below Sherbooke)
Bus: #24, Metro: Guy-Concordia.

IPAM is pleased to present Saskia Sassen as the first speaker in its newly-launched public lectures series.  In her lecture, Professor Sassen will speak about the changing articulation of citizenship within national states and a globalized world.  The relationship between the State and citizen is reconsidered in the context of the growing importance of cities. New types of political actors are taking shape including minority citizens and immigrants, thus redefining the political sphere.

Saskia Sassen is Robert S. Lynd Professor of Sociology and member of The Committee on Global Thought, Columbia University, New York. Her most recent books include: Territory, Authority, Rights: From Medieval to Global Assemblages (Princeton University Press, 2008); A Sociology of Globalization (WW Norton, 2007) ; Cities in a World Economy (Sage, 2006) ; and The Global City (Princeton University Press, 2001).

Saskia Sassen will give her lecture in English ; a bilingual question and discussion period will follow.

Watch the full lecture online

Open letter posted in the Montreal Gazette on November 17th, 2009

Monday, November 16th 2009

IPAM: Towards a credible model of development for Montreal

The economic, social and ecological challenges to urban development require an open-minded and forward-looking dialogue accessible to all sectors of Montréal society. For these reasons, we have founded the Institut de politiques alternatives de Montréal (IPAM), a non-partisan, think tank made up of researchers, practitioners, and other stakeholders who will contribute to urban development in Montréal over the long term.

IPAM is created as a think tank, a research centre, and an open public forum where different publics can meet, exchange ideas, and debate. Its purpose is to document, analyze, and make proposals for a better urban development of Montreal and the metropolitan region. It will act to provide a way for civil society to contribute its own innovative solutions alongside those of municipal bodies to help shape Montréal’s long-term future. Without replacing existing organisations, this citizens’ initiative seeks to contribute to viable urban planning in Montréal, to its economic and sustainable development, and local democracy. As an independent and multidisciplinary organization, IPAM aims to play a key role in the on-going municipal debate on policy choices leading to an equitable and prosperous society.

By combining the strengths and expertise of a wide range of specialists in complementary fields of activity both locally and from elsewhere, including university research, business, socioeconomics, neighbourhood roundtables, women’s organizations, ethnic communities, and environmental NGOs, we will create a centre of reference composed of people who will mobilize around issues of ecology, sociology, economy, democracy and physical planning related to urban development and recommend courses of action for the municipal administration in each of these areas.

As a first initiative we call on the new City Administration to engage in the following three actions in the next 100 days, and offer our cooperation to do so:

  • Convene a Summit 2010 jointly with civil society on the future of Montréal to identify the priorities and the orientations for the city and the metropolitan region, including the objectives and projects anticipated to mark the 375th Anniversary of the
  • Launch a consultation process on the obligatory update of Montreal`s Urban Plan and of the overall plan for the metropolitan region, to identify priority orientations and credible rules for their implementation in relation to the Summit 2010;
  • Reinforce citizen participation by reinforcing the independent consultative agencies and at the end of Sommet de Montreal 2010, a social contract should be concluded between the city of Montreal and civil society that recognizes an ongoing formal partnership. Such a partnership would require decision-makers to regularly consult Montreal’s civil society on the priorities of our city. This partnership should result in a more holistic approach to urban development of our city/region.

These three actions would initiate for everyone that makes up the city and region’s civil society, an understanding and agreement on a definition of the parameters of city planning and development, and share a clear vision of their rightful place in a permanent, constructive, democratic and effective dialogue with political decision-makers.

Phyllis Lambert
President
Institut de politiques alternatives de Montréal (IPAM)

Dinu Bumbaru
Vice-President
Institut de politiques alternatives de Montréal (IPAM)

Dimitri Roussopoulos
Vice-President
Institut de politiques alternatives de Montréal (IPAM)

Press Review, October 15, 2009

Revue de presse_15 oct 2009

Une exposition universelle est une idée du 19e siècle (Phyllis Lambert), par André Duchesne, La Presse, 14 octobre 2009

Montréal en déficit de leadership, selon Phyllis Lambert, par Jean-Michel Nahas, Rue Frontenac, 15 octobre 2009

With great power comes great sustainability, par Emilio Comay del Junco, McGill Daily, 19 octobre 2009

IPAM : Laboratoire d’idées, par Alain Rochereau, Voir, 22 octobre 2009

Launch of the Institut de politiques alternatives de Montréal

A think tank is created to shed light on urban planning and development policy in Montréal.

Montréal, 14 October 2009 — Phyllis Lambert, architect, Founding Director and Chair of the Board of Trustees of the CCA, Dimitri Roussopoulos, founder of the Montréal Urban Ecology Centre, and Dinu Bumbaru, Policy Director of Héritage Montréal, announced today the creation of a think tank, the Institut de politiques alternatives de Montréal (IPAM). This citizens’ initiative seeks to contribute to viable urban planning in Montréal, to its economic and sustainable development, and local democracy. As an independent and multidisciplinary organisation, IPAM has been formed to play a key role over the long term in the municipal debate on policy choices leading to an equitable and prosperous society.

The economic, social and ecological challenges to urban development require an open-minded dialogue accessible to all sectors of Montréal society. IPAM is created as a think tank, a research centre, and an open public forum where different publics can meet, exchange ideas, and debate. It will act to provide a way for civil society to contribute its own innovative solutions alongside those of municipal bodies to help shape Montréal’s long-term future.

“The considerable impact of economic development in the City of Montréal and the megaprojects it has proposed, clearly indicate that we are currently at a major crossroad,” said Phyllis Lambert. “The establishment of IPAM is essential: for it is clear that everyone that makes up the city’s civil society must understand and agree on a definition and parameters of city planning, and they must share a clear vision of their rightful place in a permanent, constructive, democratic and effective dialogue with political decision-makers.”

An independent, multidisciplinary, and inclusive organisation, IPAM’s purpose is to play a key role in the municipal debate on policy choices leading to an equitable and prosperous society. IPAM’s intention is to contribute the expertise of individuals from different spheres within the community.

“By combining the strengths and expertise of a wide range of specialists in complementary fields of activity both locally and from elsewhere, including university research, business, socioeconomics, neighbourhood roundtables, ethnic communities, and environmental NGOs, we will create a centre of reference composed of people who will mobilise around issue of sociology, economy, democracy and physical planning related to urban development and recommend courses of action for the municipal administration in each of these areas,” added Dimitri Roussopoulos.

According to Dinu Bumbaru, “With the City about to update the Urban Master Plan, Montreal needs a framework that integrates urban planning, economic planning and sustainable development, which is why IPAM will establish six working groups to tackle questions of long-term economic and cultural development: heritage, poverty, social housing and social justice, ecology, urban planning and transportation, and democracy.”

IPAM’s work will concentrate on the following two activities:

  • Dissemination information and holding public debates by organizing public forums, conferences and seminars concerning a great variety of challenges in urban planning.
  • Monitoring the municipal administration’s activities through annual evaluation of the annual reports of the Ville de Montréal on urban planning, and of the Office de consultation publique de Montréal, and the Ombudsman’s report.

As a first initiative IPAM will, the day after the elections, call on the new City Administration to hold a citizens’ summit on the future of Montréal in partnership with civil society, permitting an exchange of ideas and experience, in order to help to establish the guidelines for the administration`s new mandate.